Monday, April 30, 2007

Rush Hour


A lovely creative psycho-blur this one! Don't forget that blur is a creative element to be used as you judge fit - if you feel it's right, do it, but you have to choose to use it, otherwise it's just an out-of-focus pic that anyone could have messed up...

Of course, there are limits. If the blur is so pronounced that you can't actually see what the reality was, or if the blur doesn't ADD something (such as emotion, a sense of being there, movement which was actually going on...) then the decision to use it was flawed.

In this case I hope that you can see that the picture was of people, a family, hurrying to catch the RER (one of the French train systems), and you get nice impressions of the carriages on the left, the family moving, the little girl (?) being pulled along, and the typical tourist or day-trippers' backpacks. Not to mention other feelings of being there such as the harsh (but softened here) omnipresent artificial lighting and the common underground scene of people rushing captured by the photographer who maybe was rushing also!
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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

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A Rainy Day In Paris


This was a superb thunderstorm that Paris had been expecting for about three weeks after the hottest April on record. I was stuck under a ledge on Ile de la Cité getting soaked and hoping that 'swimproof' was one of the characteristics of my trusty Canon.

In order to make this image a bit special as opposed to the miserable grey mush which the conditions started with I've zapped it up with a few sneaky clicks in Paint Shop Pro (which I love coz it's a lot cheaper than Photoshop and you can do plenty of nice stuff anyway so there you go).

I generally try to blur the edges between literal photographic images and what could be a painting, not least of all because snaps of city scenes are often terribly boring if you don't do something a bit special with them.

It's just my personal take on photography and you have to find your own style or slap your own stamp on your images if you want to stand out from the crowd.

Luckily there are so many people just pointing and shooting that it's not actually that difficult to make your pics stand out by learning a few simple rules. Keep reading folks - that's why I'm doing this! (Thanks to Chris de Burgh for the title of this posting, by the way, a lovely evocative song...)

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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

If you like this blog, you might appreciate these..!
Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
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And I also look after...
Hotch Potch English - The Unique English Language Site for French Speakers

Homme-aux-Sacs-ien


A not so uncommon sub-species on the capital's streets, homosacian, more bag than being, this multi-coloured plastic lump-encrusted beast roams the city's gutters and alleys, with red-shot eyes and covered in cuts , as children tug at parents' arms and are quickly dragged away...

My messing around with this pic, which I have to admit was taken in extremis, has turned out quite whacky. The kid who has just passed the bag-man seems to be holding his nose but has almost turned into a cardboard cut-out. For me it's like the three elements of the kid, his mum and the bagman have been pasted together from different pics which echoes the different universes they inhabit, only occasionally brushing up together by chance and immediately repelling each other like the same poles of magnets. That's my excuse anyway.

Saturday, April 28, 2007

Blossom Girl

The beautiful thing about this picture is the marvellous contrast between the statue's curves and the strict vertical and horizontal edges of the picture frame. It's easy to forget that the format of the picture, that is to say, the edges and they way they interact with the subject, is an important creative device. While we normally restrict ourselves to the default rectangular format, nothing says you have to! But given that it's the easiest thing to use, I do try to make sure there is some sort of logic or aesthetic reason for framing the subject in a given way.

The first instinct would be to take a picture of a statue from the front. But as luck would have it the background was unpleasant so I looked for another angle, which turned out to be from behind, and I'm charmed by the result, let's admit it, she's got a fine set of buttocks!

Smile - You're a Star !


There's a strange bridge in Paris which has always intrigued me and I've finally got a shot I'd been thinking of for quite a while.

The reason it's weird is because it looks over the many tracks coming out of Gare du Nord and notably looks down onto the Eurostar trains and drivers waiting to head off. And what's REALLY funny is that you can rather voyeristically see what Eurostar drivers do just before zooming a few hundred passengers off to London or Brussels, eating a sandwich, picking their noses or whatever.

I've often wondered what it would be like to be a driver going back and forth day after day, year after year, always traveling but never really getting any where because you always end up somewhere you've already been.

This shot fits nicely into my 'Trapped' series which I used to call 'Behind Bars' and I think the metaphor is apt here.

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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

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Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
Paris Set Me Free Newsletter - A Superb Resource for all Photographers
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Paris Set Me Free Boutique - Browse Our On-line Store for Fun Photo Gifts

And I also look after...
Hotch Potch English - The Unique English Language Site for French Speakers

Theatre Thirteen


A nice little shot which was devilishly difficult to get right because of the contrast between the black paint and the light sky and buildings in the reflection which was the whole point of the picture. This I believe is a famous theatre/cinema down the hill a bit from the touristy section of Montmartre round the corner from one of the two remaining windmills. Paris is so full of funny little quirks if you look around you you never know what you're going to find.

Paved With


Writing on the Wall


I asked my daughter what her favourite words were and she gave me this list (she's just turned 10):
pickle, squish, love, together, forever, satin, symphony, satelite dish (but she deleted this after), seaweed, compost, composer and pianist
It's a pretty good list, I reckon, and I don't think I could come up with a better one.
This wall which I only recently discovered in Paris is called the 'I-Love-You Wall' as it's covered in 'I love you's written in about a hundred languages and as rather cool. This sort of composition begs to completely fill the frame and create its own universe, devoid of external influences, well, almost... In fact there is a great piece of graffiti just above the I-love-yous which transforms it from great to exceptional. How the artist actually got up there is one of those enigmas of our time, but there it is, and a pleasure to stumble across.

Friday, April 27, 2007

Self


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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

Accordez-moi un Air d'Antan


This girl enchanted me. She had a really weird, indefinable sort of other-worldly charm. Her costume, her evocative melodies and her gentle swaying and far-away gaze was a potent combination.
I took my shots, didn't talk to her, humbly offered my coins and scurried off, but she's one of those people that stick in your mind and I can't help wondering what she's about. Whether she's a student or a professional musician or married or single or deep and meaningful or, well... weird.
I guess I'll never know if I don't go back to that place (Montmartre) and strike up a conversation. Except that often a picture has captured a moment in time which could be destroyed if you asked the subject to step out of the frame. I wonder if I'll ever see her again...

Not Everyone's Dream Destination


I'm a BIG fan of ads, but more for photographic opportunities than for their intrinsic value. The 'Antipub' movement is a bunch of people who consider the constant bombardment of marketing messages in the public transport system to be an invasion of our peace of mind and every now and then they 'hit' a station and cover the ads with anti-advertising slogans.
This one is relatively tame, but it's interesting to see that the happy shiny world of Disney isn't globally appreciated or respected and it's true that very often we don't even realise the extent to which our buying decisions are influenced by factors of which we are not aware.
Rich sepia because the colour version looked really boring!

Pretty Enough

Here's a typical French 'mairie' or town hall as we know them (in the UK in any case) and the shot's pretty enough I reckon.

The notable thing about this shot is the light. It was taken at twilight in the evening, and combines natural and artificial light and the result is always interesting. You get the deep blue sky as the sun goes down mixed with the rich orange street lamps illuminating the town hall and the street sign. It's worth experimenting with these conditions and it makes a great excuse for a stroll on a balmy summer's evening.

I'm quite pleased with the composition, but I had to chop of the bottom half of the building as there was a big white van messing up the shot. I've got a vertical version of this but The Van is there and I'm not convinced it should be but it was too heavy to move!
______________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

If you like this blog, you might appreciate these..!
Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
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Paris Set Me Free Tours - Wonderful Photo Tours of this Incredible City
Paris Set Me Free Boutique - Browse Our On-line Store for Fun Photo Gifts

And I also look after...
Hotch Potch English - The Unique English Language Site for French Speakers

King Crimson, Eat Your Heart Out..!


Yes, I know it reminds you of THAT album cover (for those of you old enough to remember the SHOCK when you saw it in the record store racks - it REALLY stood out...
But there it is, In The Court of the Crimson King relived, in all its gory... there's nothing as good as autoderision, I can tell you!

Let The Music Thru Ya


Never tried to master the sax - never intend to do so, but nevertheless have limitless respect for those who do... hats off to you guys! It's such a 'feeling' instrument (and sound)... (P.S. Sudden doubt - that IS a saxophone, isn't it...)

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

A Wallace Moment


I'm feeling vaguely queasy as I publish this image... it's so... Paris.
But, at the same time, a great number of people spend an enormous amount of time trying to take pretty, typical pictures of the French capital that I feel I should justify it.
One can easily get far too blasé about photography. And even pretentious. When I show people around the marvels of Paris I sometimes forget that the typical, clichéd pics are exactly what will impress and delight the folks back home. So forgive me for my cynicism!!!
Photographically speaking, I was worried about this shot. I wanted the green of the classic Parisian fountain to be rich and deep, in contrast to the background, but I didn't have a point of contrast in the space necessary in front of the right-gazing statue...
But with a slight repositioning of myself (i.e. I moved my backside...) I could get the evocotive red of a typical French café's awnings into the shot, red being a superb compliment to the deep fountain green, and thought, ok, it's not so bad in the end...!

Self


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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Nothin' Goin' On...


In a very pleasant park round the back of Sacré Coeur, here's a relaxed chappy indeed. One of the nice thing about Montmartre is that despite the millions of tourists, they all (well, about 95% of them) seem to troop sheepishly around Place du Tertre (the artists' square) and of course the church. Which is fine by me, coz I can take pictures like this of the real locals relaxing or just, well, living their lives in relative calm, even if it is just a stone's throw from the masses.
The guy popped his head up just a couple of seconds after I snapped, and seemed to be looking at me suspiciously, so I didn't dare trying for a better shot. But, and this is the important thing, I did get the shot. Which allows me to re(share) two mega-secrets for getting nice pics, which I'll probably compile into an book some day which will make me ridiculously famous, but until then:
Mega Secret 1: Take lots of shots
Mega Secret 2: Take the shot
Seemingly similar but actually quite different - the first is just to increase the odds of getting a great expression or composition purely by numbers - shoot and shoot and shoot - why not? It's free on digital!
The second in essence means don't hesitate. When you see something cool but fleeting get a shot immediately - get that camera to your eye and snap. Then if the shot is still there you can try and do better, but miss the moment and it's gone forever, as we all know.

Monday, April 23, 2007

Mellow Yellow


There's nothing exceptional about this shot, as far as I'm concerned, but it does illustrate a few basic principles of both what you can do, and what you can't do in certain spontaneous circumstances.
The spontaneous circumstances were wandering around some of the back streets of Montmartre and seeing a rather pretty flower through the bars in a private garden.
Lighting was ok - not too harsh, but in this not particularly computer-manipulated shot the camera hasn't quite managed to render all the subtle hues, especially in the petal as it goes from saturated yellow to white highlight - never mind.
One of the big problems with flowers is that the slightest breeze and they're bobbing around all over the place. Add that to natural camera shake and a long zoom for detail which compounds the problem and you're risking a blurred pic I'm afraid. Solutions are to bump up the ISO to get a faster shutter speed and prop yourself up soundly against the bars you're shooting through, even resting the lens against one of them which can really help a lot, as solid iron bars don't tend to wobble as much as squatting, shuddering photographers...
Composition, finally, is up to you, but do FILL the frame unless there's a really good reason for not doing so and for goodness' sake don't put the flower slap-bang in the middle of the frame. Oh, and you can experiment with that little setting with the flower piccy thing on the dial (the 'close up' position..) to see if it makes any difference. That's all folks!

Sunday, April 22, 2007

Based on Experience


Musicians form an integral part of Paris street life, and the variety and quality of what you will see and hear, respectively, as you wander around is impressive.
This shot is an example of the probably well-tutored musician who just isn't making ends meet or is waiting that prestigious slot in some reasonable orchestra and suppliments his meagre income by busking. In this case the quality, at least to these uneducated ears, is lovely, and the priviledge of being able to capture such an image and enjoy beautiful live music is marvellous.
The shot isn't perfect of course, and the music isn't really free if you are like me and consider that you should at least offer something for the double sight/sound gift he is offering you, and I always throw a few coppers into the hat after taking the picture.
Technically speaking, taking shots like this is a challenge. Inevitably, the background is horrendous - people walking past, bright green litter bins overflowing with McDonalds cartons, assorted and unwanted vehicle-bits as here with the motorcycle - and you have to use your imagination to overcome these problems. The classics are throw the background out of focus, zoom in to fill the frame with the subject as much as poss (a golden rule, folks!) and move your freakin' legs (your 'other' zoom!) and get the best composition always always watching the background!
Morally speaking, does this guy actually own copyright in any way over this image if I make money out of it, or even if I don't. I'm afraid I'm a little bit fuzzy on this one, but you have to be careful about this - more on this later as I find out the facts!
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Thursday, April 19, 2007

Peek-A-Boo


I love the fact that Paris never ceases to surprise me. I discovered this curiosity the other day as I was taking a lovely American couple around... well, I'll leave it to you to tell me if you can! The colour of the wall and the shutters might help you, because it's actually part of an extremely well-known little building...

Photographically speaking, I'm kinda pleased with this shot. I chose a wide aperture, as far as I can remember (which means puting the camera on aperture priority, or turning the dial to the 'Av' setting on most models), and then whizzing another rotating little wheel thing to bring the number down to about 5.6. That means that when you focus on the subject, what's nearer or further away should be nicely thrown out of focus, as you can see here is the case with the shutters behind the face and especially the leaves in the blurry leaves in the foreground.

The face was focused on by restricting the focusing system to a single point rather than the multi-point system which normally produces good results. Focus the little red point on the subject and then reframe keeping the button pressed half-way down. This is vital when there is so much other stuff around the face which could influence the focusing system if the zone is too large.

A final aesthetic point, although I've probably spelt that wrongly: the face is nicely framed on all sides by leaves, shadows or shutters, and is placed slightly off to the right (as much as I was able to) so that it has a plenty of the shot 'in front' of it to 'look into'.

______________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

If you like this blog, you will love these..!
Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
Paris Set Me Free Newsletter - A Superb Resource for all Photographers
Paris Set Me Free Course - A Rich and Stimulating Photography Course
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Paris Set Me Free Boutique - Browse Our On-line Store for Fun Photo Gifts

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Wednesday, April 18, 2007

Snailed Under


Always been a bit of a bugbear this one for me, this French propensity for putting these slimy slithering things into their mouths, whatever they might claim about the invigorating (camouflaging?) effects of garlic, butter, salt and parsley. I mean, shouldn't they be slooping around the garden eating my mother's daffodils, and what happens if you get an antenna stuck between your teeth... eugheugh!
The shot was taking in a low-lit restaurant with a not-so-amazing camera on a not-so-high res setting. What's more it was pushed up to ISO 1600 (which increases sensitivity, thereby allowing you to take pics in dim situations) trying not to use flash, which as you know I rarely appreciate, but a high ISO does degrade the image. This is the result.
Luckily, my policy is that the image is what it is, and doesn't have to answer to anyone if the artist has decided that's how it's going to me. A great policy, I think! To top it off I've played around slightly with it on the computer and I'm reasonably happy with the result, but more for the image than for its quality. I'm a firm believer that the image should be made before pressing the shutter button. Call me old school, but that's the way I learnt, back in the days when every 'click' cost money, and don't forget the old computer adage 'rubbish in, rubbish out'!
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Tuesday, April 17, 2007

Gutter Lips



This is one of those deliciously ironic images - someone supposedly so beautiful cruelly reduced to such humiliation - a symbol of our superficial, throwaway society...

Paris has many special charms, as the cover indicates, but for a real-life photographer like me one of the most important is this omnipresent contrast between airbrushed beauty and sordid squalor.

Although this is only a magazine image, it could just as easily have been a piece of real human flesh cluttering up the gutter, as some of my pictures show from time to time. But sometimes the reality is too painful to look at and symbolism is more palatable. More cheerful stuff next time - promise!

Monday, April 16, 2007

Spooky St. Germain


Love this pic. How many shots do you think it took me to get the bird in the right place? Oops, almost gave away a professional secret there folks ;-)
Had to go for the spooky look here, sepia overkill and suchlike. Don't see why I shouldn't - it's my pic! I try to vary my effects but I'm a sucker for this lovely rich browny-orange, as you probably know.
Try it out and see how great you can make an ordinary photo of a church or a graveyard look. If it's a great picture to start with so much the better!

Thursday, April 12, 2007

Walk Across The Rooftops


Probably quite a few of you can tell me straight away where this was taken from! Of course, from the steps of Montmartre in front of Sacré Coeur.

With the sort of incredible detail there is in this view I really regretted, in retrospect, not having my tripod with me, which is really essential to produce a professional-quality shot of this type of scene. But... I didn't have it but took the shot anyway (ALWAYS take the shot - you never know...) and managed to sharpen it up on the computer afterwards to acceptable quality for this size display.

You should always choose your resolution and level of compression to match how you want to display the picture later. Showing it on a web page is very different from printing it large on photo paper - the latter should be taken in much higher quality if you want to be completely satisfied with the result.

I've got a bit of a thing about Parisian roofs - they're lovely. All that grey metal and orangy chimney pots - marvellous (not so easy to see here - try clicking on the photo to see if the slightly larger version on the web site is better).
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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

If you like this blog, you will love these..!
Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
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Paris Set Me Free Boutique - Browse Our On-line Store for Fun Photo Gifts

And I also look after...
Hotch Potch English - The Unique English Language Site for French Speakers

What He Was Looking At

Said I'd tell you what he was looking at a few days back - did you guess? Yes! He was craning his head back to look at La Grande Arche at La Defense, which continues the line that goes straight from the Louvre pyramid, the little arch, the Obelisk at Concorde and l'Arc de Triomphe, although the anomalie is that the biggest arch isn't quite square on to the line - it's off at a bit of an angle, and I used to know why but can't remember - can you help me, anyone?
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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

If you like this blog, you will love these..!
Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
Paris Set Me Free Newsletter - A Superb Resource for all Photographers
Paris Set Me Free Course - A Rich and Stimulating Photography Course
Paris Set Me Free Tours - Wonderful Photo Tours of this Incredible City
Paris Set Me Free Boutique - Browse Our On-line Store for Fun Photo Gifts

And I also run...
Hotch Potch English - The Unique English Language Site for French Speakers

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

This Way Up


You want statues? I'll give you statues. Paris is full of the darn things! And therein lies a problem... how on earth do you take an interesting and, dare we hope for it, an original photo of a mouldy old statue?

Good question. I generally rack my brains to come up with something which is a little bit better than a point and shoot shot, calling on all my armoury of tricks and techniques and applying any or all of whichever seem most appropriate - is that vague enough?!

Specifically here, although it's a pretty straightforward shot and difficult to be creative, I've tilted the camera to add dynamism and more dramatic angles of the arms and the sword in relation to the rectangular frame. The finger is nicely isolated in the corner, pointing symbolically skyward, and the now-downward-sloping sword along with the eyes suggest at some hapless prey or non-sympathiser (oops, sorry) about to be chopped up or driven through... (I'll show you who that might be in a variation on this shot later in this blog) Finally, I've made sure the contrast and saturation are pleasing and chosen a nice warm orangy-sepia type of hue which I'm particularly partial to.

What do you think?

______________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free

If you like this blog, you will love these..!

Paris Set Me Free - The Ultimate Paris Photography Website
Paris Set Me Free Newsletter - A Superb Resource for all Photographers
Paris Set Me Free Course - A Rich and Stimulating Photography Course
Paris Set Me Free Tours - Wonderful Photo Tours of this Incredible City
Paris Set Me Free Boutique - Browse Our On-line Store for Fun Photo Gifts

And I also run...
Hotch Potch English - The Unique English Language Site for French Speakers

Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Love, By Any Other Name...


It was up by Montmartre, this one, nice image, regular guy, good to see him still in touch with his roots... more or less ! ;-)

Don't let mimes or 'living statues' fool you... they're devilishly difficult to photograph! They're a bit like kids and animals - always ready to move or jig about just when you're not expecting it.

The thing is to watch them. See what their behavour is. Notice how often they play with the kids by suddenly opening their eyes to scare them and so on. Patience is one of the photographer's key tools, unfortunately, just waiting for the moment, and here's an instance where it really pays off, even if it's just to get them standing (or sitting) completely still !
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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
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Sunday, April 08, 2007

Yum Yum 2

Another take on the last subject - the coffee cups and jug still life in a Parisian café. I just wanted to mention a couple of things to bear in mind when taking still lifes.

First of all, the subject itself should be interesting in some way. That way could be the colours, the shapes, the atmosphere they evoke and others. In this case the colours are very basic - more or less black and white some tones of grey, and the rich orangy-brown of the croissant. There is silver as well of course, in the spoon and the jug, but silver in fact reflects the colours around it, so doesn't count in a way! Look carefully and you'll see what I mean. (It's also something to remember when you don't want a lovely picture of you taking the photo perfectly reflected in some shiny object or other where people will say 'Oh look - it's you!'

It's also important to keep things simple. Here I've zoomed in so that there is no extraneous 'noise' at all. You can't see the edge of the table at any place, which gets rid of the disturbance of chairs, bags, bits of legs and hands, cigarette butts and so on. It also gives a very pure picture where you can concentrate on the nice circular forms and imagine what a delicious croissant and tasty cup of coffee and lovely sunny morning that must have been... and it was!!! Can't you just see this simple but expressive shot in a tourist brochure or on the cover of my next book..? No? Oh well, I'll keep on trying!

Here are the Aussie ladies again - thanks for a great tour ladies - I'm looking forward to seeing your pics!

__________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
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Yum yum !


Imagine a sunny Sunday morning, a typical Parisian café, a delicious soft-but-crispy croissant, and a strong expresso waking up your wide-angles... it's just another day on a Paris photo tour, folks, and my three Aussie ladies bought into it, snapping away at our empty cups and my three-quarters-eaten croissant with admirable enthusiasm!

Allayne, Georgina and Helen will soon be showing shots of our little round table and dirty crockery to a photo group in an Aussie camera club in a town whose name I can't remember but I'm sure it was something like 'Woolamaloo' - something with lots of 'o's in it in any case - put me right, ladies! Check them out!

__________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
http://www.parissetmefree.com
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Saturday, April 07, 2007

Through The Looking Glass



Reflections are, as I often say, a great way to inject a bit of life into your pictures. And curved mirror surfaces are better than most.

You can include yourself in the image (as I've done here), or by putting yourself off to the side of the subject you can easily crop yourself out and create an unusual and eye-catching picture.

Always keep an eye out for opportunities to use reflections creatively - and let me see the results!

___________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
http://www.parissetmefree.com
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Friday, April 06, 2007

Window Dressing


As a fan of reflections I love combining two images in one which is quite easy with this technique. Sometimes it's hard to work out exactly what is real and what is being reflected, which is a nice effect. Of course the glorious streets of Paris are often being reflected in street windows, as is the case here.

Through the window there is an interesting statue of a bronze woman in a strange sort of ape-like position. As this shot was taken in the company of two american ladies as part of my 'Mysterious Montmartre' tour I'll leave you with a typically American expression... Go Figure!
___________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
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Thursday, April 05, 2007

End of an Evening


Paris and empty beer cans are pretty synonymous, unfortunately... there are way too many rogues roaming the streets than is good for us...

Photographically, you've got to grab the moment, play with the orangy overhead lights, balance the composition, and Bang! It's in the can.

Don't bother mucking with the colours after - the warm overtones add to the feeling of the piece. As is often the case, diagonals are dominating here.
_______________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
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Here, Kitty Kitty...

Down, down, in deepest Montmartre... oh yes, folks, it's a real jungle out there, albeit a somewhat tamed one.

This shot was taken last Sunday on my aforementioned 'Mysterious Montmartre' photo tour, and would you believe you could find something so beautiful in such a busy city..? But that is Montmartre - not a quartier like the others.

This was taken in a lovely quiet little garden but it's nevertheless terribly difficult to shoot cats (in the nicest possible sense, of course!). The eyes are essential when snapping animals, and yet they will do their damnedest to elude your camera's gaze!

Keys to taking great animal pics are patience, sensitivity, silly noises, snapping ridiculous numbers of shots and, dare I say it... doggedness! Good luck.
_____________________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
http://www.parissetmefree.com
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Wednesday, April 04, 2007

What Is The Name Of This Street ?


A strange occurence - and one which makes you wonder what exactly is the name of this 'rue'!

It was taken on one of my photo tours - this one was called 'Mysterious Montmartre' and it really is a terrific stroll around the hidden backwaters of this famous hill.

Photographically, I'm actually rather pleased with this shot. It has a beautiful balance to it, with the two name plates on one diagonal, and the two planes of musty green and red balancing them on the other diagonal, the whole sliced through by the drainpipe with a jaunty angle thrown in for good measure. Modesty's wonderful thing, isn't it?! Love the peeling paint too!

There'll be more from this trip over the next few days - hope you enjoy them.
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© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
http://www.parissetmefree.com

What Are You Looking At? (Part 2)


Did you guess where the last photo was? Leave a comment if you think you know, and I'll tell you if you're right!

Here's another one. And the question is... just what is this guy looking at?! Clue: Strictly speaking, this isn't actually in Paris, but it's just outside, just over the river Seine. Over to you, Paris fanatics!

_____________________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
http://www.parissetmefree.com

What Are You Looking At ?


I'm starting up the photo blog again, with a fun competition for you! I give you the shot, and you answer my question, OK? Here we go...

and my question is... Where is this? I'll give you a clue - it's a very famous part of Paris, high up, and well-known for what you see in the pic! If you can tell me the actual street or the name of the artist you get extra points!

_____________________________________
© 2007 Sab Will / Paris Set Me Free
http://www.parissetmefree.com

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